Senator John Heinz

RELATED NEWS

  • Dave Eggers' new novel reviewed for The New York Times go >>
  • Janien Benyus to receive 2016 Feinstone Enviornmental Award go >>
  • Gretchen Daily's work at the Natural Capital Project is profiled in Smithsonian go >>
  • John Luther Adams creates soundscape for walk between the Metropolitan Museum of Art's two branches go >>
  • Rick Lowe joins the University of Houston's College of the Arts go >>
  • Kirk Smith interviewed about concerns regarding air pollution in Chile go >>
  • Sal Khan discusses the new in-house Khan lab school go >>
  • Science Friday revisits and updates a 1992 discussion that included Daniel Sperling on electric cars go >>
  • Freeman Hrabowski writes Op-Ed in The New York Times on how communities must support student success go >>
  • Frederica Perera argues that the benefits to children's health from a reduction in fossil fuel use are enormous go >>
  • Gretchen Daily reports on China's work on ecosystem assessment go >>
  • Richard Feely is interviewed by Refinery 29 on the impact of ocean acidification go >>
  • Sal Khan is interviewed by Business Insider about his work at Kahn Academy go >>
  • Ann Hamilton creates a 'loom performance' installation for China's Art Wuzhen Exhibition go >>
  • Roz Chast is interviewed on her work and New York City go >>
  • Robert Langer wins the 2016 European Inventor Award (In Non-European Countries) go >>
  • Roz Chast talks to The Wall Street Journal about growing up and where she lived go >>
  • Joseph DeRisi is elected to the National Academy of Sciences go >>
  • Donald Berwick writes Op-Ed on how dental care should be a part of core healthcare go >>
  • Jerry Franklin named the Ecological Society of America's 2016 Eminent Ecologist go >>
  • James Nachtwey receives the Princess of Asturias Award for Communication and Humanities go >>
  • Jonathan Foley writes Op-Ed piece for bioGraphic on the importance of natural history go >>
  • Mark di Suvero is profiled in The Paris Review go >>
  • Marian Wright Edelman discusses the importance of libraries for children and families go >>
  • Sangeeta Bhatia at TED Talks Live discusses her work on early cancer detection using nanotech go >>
  • Dr. Sanjeev Arora to receive the University of New Mexico's Presidential Award of Distinction for his work on Project ECHO go >>
  • The Washington Post reviews Rita Dove's new book of Collected Poems, 1974-2004 go >>
  • Paul Anastas receives the 2016 Green Chemistry Award from the Royal Society of Chemistry go >>
  • Robert Langer's lab develops a gel-based 'second skin' to smooth wrinkled skin go >>
  • Mason Bates is profiled by KQED in San Francisco go >>
  • Robert Langer receives 2016 Benjamin Franklin Medal Institute in Life Science from the Franklin Institute go >>
  • Elizabeth Kolbert writes about those trying to protect threatened ecosystems through manmade intervention go >>
  • Sangeeta Bhatia is interviewed by CCTV America at the Clinton Global Initiative go >>
  • Dean Kamen is profiled in the Wall Street Journal go >>
  • Mason Bates is profiled by Anne Midgette of The Washinton Post go >>
  • John Luther Adams profiled as the composer-in-residence at the 2016 Big Ears Festival go >>
  • Andrew Grove, 1st Heinz Award recipient for Technology and the Economy, dies at 79 go >>
  • Frederica Perera is co-author of study on dangers of prenatal pollution exposure go >>
  • Steve Wozniak is profiled on the Reddit and Google Cloud Platform "Formative Moment" series go >>
  • Sanjeev Arora and Project ECHO are part of Fast Company article on social media, medical care and the developing world go >>
  • Leroy Hood's Institute for Systems Biology to join with Providence Health and Science go >>
  • Robert Langer surveys the diverse output from his MIT research lab go >>
  • Marian Wright Edelman to receive the Thomas Jefferson Foundation Medal go >>
  • James Hansen co-authors paper about future of rising heat in tropics and Middle East go >>
  • Rick Lowe is profiled in the Stanford Arts Review go >>
  • Sangeeta Bhatia and her work are profiled in MIT Technology Review go >>
  • Sal Khan talks about his early history on the Reddit and Google Cloud Platform "Formative Moment" series go >>
  • Jake Wood, of Team Rubicon, is named to The Chronicle of Philanthropy's 2016 40 Under 40 list go >>
  • Elizabeth Kolbert writes about rising sea levels and South Florida for The New Yorker go >>
  • Dan Rather interviews Chris Field about climate change go >>
  • Salman Khan is interviewed by Here and Now on WBUR go >>
  • Donald Berwick to join the Health Policy Commission in Massachusetts go >>
  • Richard Alley is part of panel on The Dane Rehm Show discussing the melting ice sheets go >>
  • Aaron Wolf wins American Association of Geographers Gilbert White Public Service Award go >>
  • Salman Khan teams up with Tata Trusts to offer free online education to students in India in local languages go >>
  • Jonathan Foley writes a piece on Medium, "Sometimes, A Whale Dies" go >>
  • Jake Wood, of Team Rubicon, is a guest on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert go >>
  • Marian Wright Edelman co-recipient of the Patino Moore Legacy Award from the Marguerite Casey Foundation go >>
  • DOC NYC Film Festival premieres Ian Cheney's new film: Bluespace go >>
  • Sanjeev Arora announces major expansion of Project ECHO with the American Academy of Pediatrics go >>
  • Janine Benyus to join U.S. Green Building Council board of directors in 2016 go >>
  • Bruce Katz is named as Brookings Institution's inaugural Centennial Scholar, studying the innovations and impacts of global urbaniation go >>
  • Jonathan Foley writes on why museums can help change the world go >>
  • Mason Bates inaugural Kennedy Center Jukebox is reviewed by The Washington Post go >>
  • Janine Benyus is interviewed by The Dirt (American Society of Landscape Architects) go >>
  • Hugh Herr and his vision of bionics for the future profiled in the November issue of Popular Science go >>
  • John Luther Adams named artist-in-residence for 2016 Knoxville Big Ears music festival go >>
  • Leila Janah featured as one of five technology visionaries in The New York Times 'T' magazine go >>
  • Janine Benyus speaks in October at SXSW Eco 2015 bringing together the natural and manmade worlds go >>
  • Jay Keasling is co-recipient of $1 million Samson Prime Minister's Prize for Innovation in Alternative Fuels go >>
  • Curt Ellis writes OpEd for CNBC on how funding a "School lunch program could save $103 billion" go >>
  • TIME publishes a photo series by James Nachtwey on the refugee crisis go >>
  • Janine Benyus to recieve the Edward O. Wilson Biodiversity Technology Pioneer Award from Montanta State University go >>
  • Rita Dove to give the Poetry Society's Annual Lecture in October in the UK go >>
  • Arthur Mitchell receives Roosevelt Institute Freedom of Speech and Expression Award go >>
  • The Boston Globe reviews James Nachtwey's photography exhibit at The Currier Museum go >>
  • Paul Farmer launches the University of Global Health Equity in Rwanda go >>
  • James Balog captures images of California wildfires for The New York Times Magazine go >>
  • Denzel Washington to bring all 10 plays by August Wilson to HBO go >>
  • In "Biomimicry," a short film by Leila Conners, Janine Benyus presents the broad vision of the principles of biomimicry go >>
  • Ann Hamilton will receive the 2014 National Medal of Arts go >>
  • Richard Jackson pens OpEd piece for Corpus Christi Caller Times go >>
  • Living On Earth interviews Beverly Wright on racism and post-Katrina New Orleans go >>
  • Marian Wright Edelman calls for diversity in children's books go >>
  • Elizabeth Kolbert profiles Christiana Figueres, who oversees the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change go >>
  • Roz Chast talks about her art and the exhibit on her work at the Norman Rockwell Museum go >>
  • Richard Feely is profiled on The Washington Post's The Fed Page go >>
  • Louis Guillette, a pioneer in the field of endocrine disruption, dies at 60 go >>
  • Frederica Perera's NYC study links prenatal exposure to airborne toxins to damage to brain development go >>
  • Brenda Krause Eheart's multi-generational community, Hope Meadows, is profiled by NPR go >>

The Heinz Awards

2005

Sidney Drell

Sidney Drell receives the Heinz Award for Public Policy for his decades-long contributions toward reducing the threat of nuclear catastrophe while ensuring the nation's security and military pre-eminence.

A theoretical physicist, educator and authority in the arena of arms control, Dr. Drell has provided wise and firm counsel for more than 40 years. His tireless and effective leadership has helped advance the United States' efforts to reduce the danger and proliferation of nuclear weapons, without ever compromising the nation's defense.

In addition to his academic career at Stanford University doing pioneering research in elementary particle physics, Dr. Drell has been a ubiquitous presence in the debate over major defense issues. He has served on countless advisory panels to Congress, the U.S. Departments of Defense and Energy and the Central Intelligence Agency and is a member of an elite cadre of scientists who advise the government on technical and highly classified national security matters. He is currently a professor emeritus at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, having retired as its deputy director in 1998, and is a senior fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution.

As a scientist, Dr. Drell's contributions through the years have been varied. He helped fix bugs in the nation's first reconnaissance satellite, Corona; helped develop verification methods for the world's first nuclear arms control treaty, and was a leading scientific critic of the ballistic missile defense system during the 1980s.

Dr. Drell is a founding and still-active member of JASON, a prestigious advisory panel of academic scientists on various issues related to national security. Ten years ago, when the nation was faced with the debate over whether weapons labs should be able to conduct underground nuclear weapons explosions in order to assure that the warheads were safe and reliable, he led a JASON study that concluded that nuclear testing was not necessary to assure the effectiveness and safety of weapons. Only last year, his intellectual arguments in opposing a new nuclear weapon (the so-called "bunker buster") helped provide the rationale for removing much of the proposed funding of the weapon from the omnibus budget bill.

In mentoring other scientists through the years, Dr. Drell has urged each of them to analyze the public policy implications of advances in their field of work. He has also mentored many scholars in public policy and arms control, and urged them to ground their policy work in underlying technical realities.

With unparalleled expertise and a steady, reasoned point of view, Dr. Sidney Drell has had a profound influence on American policymakers throughout the Cold War and beyond. His contributions have helped reduce the threat of nuclear calamity and have made the world a safer place in which to live.

Note: This profile is excerpted from the commemorative brochure published at the time of the awards' presentation.


UPDATES SINCE RECEIVING THE HEINZ AWARD

February 2013 -Physicist, Sidney Drell, receives the National Medal of Science for his work both on quantum electrodynamics and policy issues dealing with the threat of nuclear weapons. - Stanford Report

October 2008 - Sidney Drell inducted into American Academy of Arts and Sciences' 228th class of Fellows, an honor that celebrates cutting edge research and scholarship, artistic accomplishment and exemplary service to society. - American Academy of Arts and Sciences

April 2005 - Drell and Ambassador Goodby release a study that concerns the reality and necessity of the United States nuclear program. In the report, the men "calculated the actual nuclear needs of the U.S.," according to the administration's figures, which involves looking at and treating other countries as "potential enemy states". The study concludes that even with a cautious estimate, the U.S. nuclear arsenal is greater than it needs to be. - The Toronto Star

Speech

5/24/2005 - Acceptance Speech

Thank you, Teresa Heinz. For me this is a truly a tremendous honor. I am particularly honored when I consider the founding principles and the stated criteria for this award; and when I consider that this award celebrates the commitment and the record of the late Senator John Heinz as a fighter throughout his public career for principles of great importance to this nation and to the entire world - principles that are currently being advanced with intense commitment by Teresa Heinz, and with which I closely associate myself.

Fundamental science is a voyage through uncharted seas to unknown shores. But inevitably its advances spawn new technologies. They can be enormously beneficial for the human condition, and most have been. But they also have the potential for creating grave new dangers if misapplied. This presents societies with policy choices that are important and often very difficult.

I believe that the scientific community has an obligation to use its special insights to assist society to make wise choices in applying new technologies. This conviction led to my involvement in addressing profound public policy and national security implications of nuclear weapons, now that we must live or die with these monstrous creations. I loved my physics research, but I simply could not ignore the cold war nightmare of our civilization reduced to rubble by a conflict waged with nuclear bombs that are tens of millions of times more destructive than their predecessors.

The cold war has officially ended, but grave dangers remain. There still exists tens of thousands of nuclear weapons. Fear of an all out holocaust may have been sidelined at present, but a serious threat remains that these weapons, these most dangerous weapons, will be acquired by somehow by the most dangerous states or terrorists. Can, or will, we preserve a nonproliferation regime that over the past 60 years has succeeded in limiting the number of nuclear weapons nations to handful? That seems hardly possible if the United States insists it needs a new generation of nuclear weapons for whatever reasons - and to me they are not clear - while at the same time the other 186 treaty signatories are told they don't need them and can't have them. And if the nonproliferation regime collapses, what will happen to the 60-year old norm of their non-use since Hiroshima and Nagasaki? We still face major challenges.

There is work for us to do - much. I am very pleased that my past efforts to reduce nuclear danger have been judged worthy of this award. And I can assure you that I will continue those efforts.

Thank you.
Sidney Drell
Sidney Drell