Senator John Heinz

RELATED NEWS

  • Mona Hanna-Attisha writes OpEd for the Washington Post on the EPA's proposed limiting of types of scientific studies used for new regulations go >>
  • Robert Langer co-authors scientific article on new once-a-month contraceptive pill go >>
  • Hugh Herr is interviewed by Medgagdget.com about his work and current research on bionic limbs go >>
  • Joe DeSimone is named Ernst and Young’s Entrepreneur of the Year for 2019 go >>
  • Amanda Nguyen named recipient of a South by Southwest Community Service Award go >>
  • Rita Dove receives the 2019 Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets go >>
  • Mary Good, 6th recipient for Technology, the Economy and Employment and "true pioneer and icon for women in science," dies at 88 go >>
  • Robert Langer helps to develop a longterm oral delivery pill for malaria drug go >>
  • Kevin Jerome Everson is interviewed by online arts magazine Hyperallergic go >>
  • Sangeeta Bhatia elected to National Academy of Medicine, one of only 25 inidividuals elected to all three academies go >>
  • Ralph Lemon is profiled by Rennie McDougall for Frieze magazine go >>
  • NPR's Weekend Edition profiles Mark di Suvero go >>
  • Sanjeev Arora receives Governor of New Mexico's Distinguished Service Award for Lifetime Achievement go >>
  • Sherri Mason writes about the pervasiveness of plastics in our environment for American Scientist go >>
  • Nadine Burke Harris' work on statewide screening for childhood trauma is profiled by The Chronicle of Social Change go >>
  • Mona Hanna-Attisha writes Op-Ed for The New York Times go >>
  • Paul Farmer talks about health equity with Bay Area NPR go >>
  • Matt Mullenweg is interviewed by The Verge about Automattic's purchase of Tumblr go >>
  • Joseph DeSimone is profiled by Alejandro Cremades for Forbes go >>
  • Dave Eggers write Op-Ed piece about teh second International Congress of Youth Voices, held in Puerto Rico go >>
  • Hugh Herr is featured in 60 Minutes overview of MIT's Media Lab go >>
  • Sherri Mason named first sustainability coordinator at Penn State Behrend go >>
  • Rita Dove receives the Langston Hughes Medal from The City College of New York go >>
  • Nadine Burke Harris is profiled by NPR as California's first Surgeon General go >>
  • Mona Hanna-Attisha is interviewed about the lead-in-water crisis in Newark go >>
  • Sherri Mason writes Op-Ed on plastics for The Hill go >>
  • August Wilson's play, "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom," to be filmed in Pittsburgh for Netflix go >>
  • Greg Asner's work with his Global Airborne Observatory is profiled by The New York Times go >>
  • Sangeeta Bhatia is the 2019 recipient of the Science History Institute's Othmer Gold Medal go >>
  • Robert Langer is the recipient of the 2019 Dreyfus Prize in Chemical Sciences go >>
  • The American Institute of Chemical Engineers endows new fellowship in Robert Langer's name go >>
  • Natasha Trethewey is inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters go >>
  • U.S. Senator Richard Lugar, co-recipient of the 10th Chairman's medal, dies at 87 go >>
  • The New York Times honors the 50th anniversary of Arthur Mitchell’s pioneering Dance Theater of Harlem through the recollections of those who worked with him go >>
  • Gretchen Daily heads case study demonstrating the benefits of managing land for both economic and environmental benefits go >>
  • Nadine Burke Harris, California's first Surgeon General, is interviewed by EdSource go >>
  • Natasha Trethewey and her latest book are profiled by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette go >>
  • The New York Times profiles Carol Gilligan and her new book go >>
  • Dave Eggers' latest book, The Parade, is reviewed by the Los Angeles Times and The New York Times go >>
  • The New York Times interviews Roz Chast and her sometime writing and ukulele partner, Patricia Marx go >>
  • Ming Kuo is lead author on metastudy showing that experience of nature boosts children's academic achievement and development go >>
  • Boston Modern Orchestra Project to end their season with April tribute to John Harbison go >>
  • Michelle Alexander writes OpEd for The New York TImes on the need to face violent crime honestly and courageously go >>
  • Natasha Trethewey talks about making poetry in an interview for Guernica go >>
  • John Harbison is profiled by the Wisconsin State Journal for his 80th birthday go >>
  • Mona Hanna-Attisha pens an OpEd about remaining lessons from the Flint water crisis go >>
  • Mason Bates' first opera, "The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs," wins a Grammy for Best Opera Recording go >>
  • Edward Zigler, architect of Head Start and 5th Public Policy recipient, dies at 88 go >>
  • Nadine Burke Harris to be appointed as California's first Surgeon General go >>
  • Natasha Trethewey is named as a chancellor for The Academy of American Poets go >>
  • Luis Garden Acosta, co-recipient of the 5th Heinz Award for the Human Condition, dies at 73 go >>
  • Cary Fowler discusses the Svalbard Global Seed Vault on the BBC’s “Witness” podcast go >>
  • Arthur Mitchell is honored in a memorial service at Manhattan's Riverside Church go >>
  • Natasha Trethewey is profiled in Buzzfeed News go >>
  • Joseph DeSimone receives the 2018 National Academy of Sciences prize in convergent science go >>
  • John Harbison and his multi-decade career is profiled by Strings magazine go >>
  • Roz Chast is interviewed, on the occasion of her new retrospective, by The New York Times go >>
  • James Comer's School Development Program at the Yale Child Study Center celebrates 50 years go >>
  • Vanity Fair interviews Natasha Trethewey about her work and new retrospective poetry collection, "Monument" go >>
  • The New York Times reviews 'Relations,' with Ralph Lemon, Bebe Miller and Ishmael Houston-Jones go >>
  • Natasha Trethewey is interviewed by NPR's Weekend Edition go >>
  • John Luther Adams writes for The Guardian on why he chose music over activism go >>
  • Joseph DeRisi talks about his work and virus hunting on Still Untitled - The Adam Savage Project go >>
  • Gregory Asner to establish Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science at Arizona State University go >>
  • Jane Lubchenco awarded the 2018 Fellow Medal from California Academy of Sciences go >>
  • George Hatsopoulos, 3rd Heinz Awards recipient in Technology, the Economy and Employment, dies at 91 go >>
  • Arthur Mitchell, 7th Heinz Awards recipient for Arts and Humantities, dies at 84 go >>
  • John Luther Adams' work, In the Name of the Earth, to premiere in Central Park this Saturday go >>
  • Dave Eggers writes an article for The Guardian about The International Congress of Youth Voices go >>
  • TIME interviews Mona Hanna-Attisha on the occasion of her new book go >>
  • The Carnegie Corporation honors Mona Hanna-Attisha as one of 38 Distinguished Immigrants for 2018 go >>
  • Michelle Alexander to join The New York Times opinion pages go >>
  • Mona Hanna-Attisha is interviewed by Rachel Maddow go >>
  • Ann Hamilton's O N E E V E R Y O N E receives the Americans for the Arts’ Public Art Network award go >>
  • Hugh Herr has a new TED talk on what it would really mean to be a cyborg go >>
  • Jake Wood of Team Rubicon to receive the Pat Tillman Award for Service at 2018 ESPYs go >>
  • Mona Hanna-Attisha adapts a chapter from her new book for The New York Times' Op-Ed page go >>
  • Greg Asner helps to create high-resolution maps of Caribbean coral reefs go >>
  • Dee Boersma and her work are featured in The Pew Charitable Trusts' "After the Fact" podcast go >>
  • James Nachtwey is profiled by The Times in London as his new show, Memoria, is on in Paris go >>
  • Rita Dove talks to the Columbia Journalism Review on pairing poetry with journalism go >>
  • Abraham Verghese writes a piece for The New York Times Magazine on one major downside of electronic health records go >>
  • Sierra magazine profiles the ongoing challenges Beverly Wright and others face in combating environmental racism in New Orleans go >>
  • The LA Times explores John Luther Adams' career and his most recent work go >>
  • Mason Bates to premiere his new work, "Garden of Eden," with the Richmond Symphony Orchestra go >>
  • Jane Lubchenco receives 2018 Vannevar Bush Award go >>
  • Salman Khan receives the 2018 Visonary of the Year Award form The San Francisco Chronicle go >>
  • John Luther Adams writes in the New York Times what it is like to hear the desert in music go >>
  • Freeman Hrabowski III reflects in The Atlantic on UMBC's successes in closing the achievement gap go >>
  • John Luther Adams and his new compositition, Become Desert, are profiled by the Seattle Times go >>

The Heinz Awards

2003

Geraldine Jensen

Geraldine Jensen receives the Heinz Award for Public Policy for channeling her frustrations over an inability to collect child support for two young children into a national movement that reformed child support enforcement.

Geraldine Jensen is an improbable heroine. Over 20 years ago as a divorced mother of two sons, she found herself destitute, homeless and unable to support her family. Her ex-husband owed more than $12,000 in child support, but local officials rebuffed her pleas for help because her ex-husband had moved and could not be located. She did her own research to find his address and employment information, but officials said their hands were tied because he lived out of state. Finally, a local prosecutor complained, "I'm sick and tired of you women whining and complaining about your child support. If you think you can do a better job, go do it."

So she did just that.

With $8.86 of her last $12.00, Ms. Jensen purchased a small ad in the Sunday edition of the Toledo Blade newspaper saying, "Not Receiving Your Child Support? Call Me." A number of custodial parents in similar situations responded. She organized a meeting and within two weeks founded the Association for Children for Enforcement of Support (ACES).

Since that modest start, ACES has grown into the nation's largest child support organization, with 400 chapters in 48 states and more than 50,000 members nationwide. The organization has helped empower thousands of desperate custodial parents, most of them women, to obtain the money courts ordered paid for the support of their children. The federal Office of Child Support estimates that more than 20 million children are owed more than $83 billion in court-ordered child support. Many women, like Ms. Jensen herself, wind up on public welfare for a time because of non-support.

Ms. Jensen has also become a leading advocate of system reform. Under old laws, parents were not bound by child support orders of one state if they moved to another, and many non-custodial parents moved from state to state to dodge their responsibilities to their children. Ms. Jensen was a catalyst behind passage of the 1992 Child Support Recovery Act. That law makes it a federal offense to avoid child support if you live in a state other than where your children live. She has also been instrumental in the creation of a national computer network linking child support information from all the states, including laws that allow support to be collected through a payroll deduction. In 1995, ABC produced a made-for-television movie called Abandoned and Deceived, based on Ms. Jensen's struggle and the creation of ACES.

Geraldine Jensen embodies the uniquely American can-do spirit. She is a woman who found herself in a desperate situation but refused to be broken by the difficulties she faced. She took her own adversity and not only turned around her own life and the lives of her two sons but created a movement that has alleviated poverty for thousands of other children.

She has committed 20 years to ensure that the children of divorced parents do not become victims of poverty because of unpaid child support. Her vision and hard work have mobilized and inspired custodial parents and that convinced lawmakers to close loopholes and stiffen the penalties on deadbeat parents.

Note: This profile is excerpted from the commemorative brochure published at the time of the awards' presentation.


UPDATES SINCE RECEIVING THE HEINZ AWARD

March 2004 - Jensen announces her retirement from the Association for Children for Enforcement of Support, the organization that she founded in 1984. She will finish her last few months of her four-year term as president before stepping down in July, though she plans to retain a post on the board of directors after her retirement. - The Associated Press

January 2004 - Jensen and the Association for Children for Enforcement of Support publish a book entitled Child Support: A Complete Reference. The book addresses the implementation of child support on a national level.

October 2003 - Jensen's Association for Children for Enforcement of Support hosts a candlelight vigil to "Shine the Light of Justice for Forgotten Children". The national vigil is to honor the millions of children who are owed nearly $92.3 billion in child support that has gone unpaid.

Speech

3/3/2003 - Acceptance Speech

I thank you, Teresa, and everyone at the Foundation. I am very honored by and appreciative of this recognition. I want to thank my sons, Matt and Jake, and all the children everywhere who are my reason and my inspiration.

From the very first time that ACES' parents sat around the kitchen table talking about their children's needs for child support, we knew that the solution was collecting child support just like taxes through payroll deduction. So parents working together got Democrats and Republicans to make this a reality. And income withholding laws and criminal no support laws have caused collections to double. And I'm pleased to report that the newest numbers are out, and we are up to 60 percent of the children receiving support. ACES' members, which are mainly single parents, very low income, are a living example of people wanting a hand up from government, instead of a hand out. We want effective child support enforcement for the 20 million children now owed 88 billion dollars. So much money has gone unpaid. So many childhoods lost to poverty. And yet, child support is still often a mere afterthought, part of a fatherhood program, or part of a public assistance program; not talked about in discussions about economic security in jobs, even though support is needed to supplement low wages of families leaving welfare; not part of healthcare even though millions of children don't but should have health insurance from their non-custodial parent; and not even part of discussions about childcare.

But families have always known that non-support is a leading cause of poverty, and that real solutions keep families off welfare to begin with. Some say that marriage is the solution. We would have fewer children born to never- married parents. This is true, yet 50 percent of marriages end in divorce. Child support, taking care of our children, is the most important responsibility and privilege that we as parents have. It should be part of our very social fabric. It should be part of every policy affecting families, including the economy and taxes. When we talk about more money in the hands of more families, it should mean child support payments going to the families, rather than the government to pay back welfare. It should mean tax relief for families to take non-support as a bad debt and gain help from the IRS to collect on interstate cases. Supplementing collections for low-income parents and guaranteeing payments, is needed and possible with programs that are funded, like Fannie Mae. Parents working two jobs to put food on the table can't help kids with homework, read children a book, or provide teenagers the supervision they need. We need both parents to support children and society.

I realized long ago that I couldn't sell this problem alone. And so I do accept this award on behalf of all of the thousands of single parents involved in ACES across the country, because we build ACES, but we need your help. And we hope that you will join together with us to solve this problem and to make sure that every child receives the support that they so need and deserve.

Thank you very much.
Geraldine Jensen
Geraldine Jensen