Senator John Heinz

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The Heinz Awards

2008

Ann Hamilton

Ann Hamilton receives the Heinz Award in the Arts and Humanities for a body of work that has established her as one of contemporary art's most influential voices.

A provocative visual artist, Ann Hamilton's installations around the world have woven a broad palette of media into engaging sensory environments. Her work is truly transformational, both in its visual beauty and the visceral impact it has had on the communities that have helped create and sustain it. With an oeuvre that spans three decades, she has solidified her place as one of contemporary art's most influential voices.

Noted for a dense accumulation of materials, Ms. Hamilton's installations create immersive experiences that respond to the architectural presence and social history of their sites. She has forged a reputation as a perceptive, poignant observer whose art explores the places and forms for live, emotive, face-to-face experiences. Influenced by the disciplines of sculpture, photography, textiles, poetry, video and performance, her installations often involve impressive arrangements of materials: a room lined with small canvas dummies, 48,000 used blue work shirts layered on a platform, a floor covered in a "skin" of 750,000 copper pennies and honey. Known to utilize sound, found objects and the spoken word, Ms. Hamilton's environments are sensory explorations of time, language and memory.

A native of Columbus, Ohio, Ms. Hamilton's earliest interest was in textile design, and later, after earning her Master's in Fine Arts from Yale University, in sculpture. Over the past 30 years, her works have appeared in exhibitions around the world. One of her first major exhibitions, reciprocal fascinations (1985), featured a central space surrounded by a steel cage perimeter that housed 45 pigeons, surrounding the viewer with the presence of free-flying birds. Installations at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles (capacity of absorption), at the Musee d'art contemporain in Lyon, France (mattering) and at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. (at hand), solidified her place among the most influential forces within the visual arts. Ms. Hamilton represented the United States at the 48th Venice Biennale, where her piece, myein (the Greek root of the word mystery), responded to the neo-classical architecture of the American pavilion to create a poetic evocation and accounting of America's social history.

Ann Hamilton is herself a dynamic tour de force. Her installations - labor intensive, participatory and uniquely uncommon in the way in which they innovate and captivate - have mesmerized audiences for more than a quarter century. By blazing new possibilities within the visual arts, she has singularly helped enlarge our collective vocabulary for how we have come to define and appreciate the arts in all its forms.

Note: This profile is excerpted from the commemorative brochure published at the time of the awards' presentation.


UPDATES SINCE RECEIVING THE HEINZ AWARD

September 2015 - Ann Hamilton is a recipient of the 2014 National Medal of Arts, presented at The White House by President Obama. The awards are provided by the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, which were created as independent federal agencies by Congress in 1965. - The Columbus Dispatch

Speech

10/21/2008 - Acceptance Speech

It seems like the best way to say thank you is by making something.  I have been thinking for a long while about the six letters and space between that make up the two words - TO MAKE ... about the work of making.  But long before I thought about the multiple forms making can take - long before I knew how many pages it occupies in the dictionary - and thought about - the moral and poetic responsibilities of its many possibilities.

I learned about how powerful a thing MAKING is.  I would sit on the couch beside my grandmother who you saw in the film - Lois Moore Bennett - and watch with fascination as she took a line of yarn - pulled it up and around a needle - to make - in time - a sweater that not only made us feel beautiful, but kept us warm ... when she pulled that same yarn through the eye of a needle she would draw a pattern into existence that hadn't been there before.  And there - pressed against her leg - following the incremental movements of her threads - I learned that the work of making - is an act of caring.  It is a social act - it isn't something we do alone - it is something that we do together - and it is reciprocal.

We are here today to celebrate HOW human making can shape a world.  I am so grateful - to share the honor of this company - which acknowledges and honors in turn - the many whose conversation and love and late hours of help on the floor have catalyzed and made permission to imagine "what-if" ... and those are the sweetest words of possibility - of imagination and change what-if?

I am grateful to the Heinz Family Foundation - to the living legacy it inspires and to ALL the work that is ahead - thank you.

Ann Hamilton