Senator John Heinz

RELATED NEWS

  • TIME interviews Mona Hanna-Attisha on the occasion of her new book go >>
  • The Carnegie Corporation honors Mona Hanna-Attisha as one of 38 Distinguished Immigrants for 2018 go >>
  • Michelle Alexander to join The New York Times opinion pages go >>
  • Mona Hanna-Attisha is interviewed by Rachel Maddow go >>
  • Ann Hamilton's O N E E V E R Y O N E receives the Americans for the Arts’ Public Art Network award go >>
  • Hugh Herr has a new TED talk on what it would really mean to be a cyborg go >>
  • Jake Wood of Team Rubicon to receive the Pat Tillman Award for Service at 2018 ESPYs go >>
  • Mona Hanna-Attisha adapts a chapter from her new book for The New York Times' Op-Ed page go >>
  • Greg Asner helps to create high-resolution maps of Caribbean coral reefs go >>
  • Dee Boersma and her work are featured in The Pew Charitable Trusts' "After the Fact" podcast go >>
  • James Nachtwey is profiled by The Times in London as his new show, Memoria, is on in Paris go >>
  • Rita Dove talks to the Columbia Journalism Review on pairing poetry with journalism go >>
  • Abraham Verghese writes a piece for The New York Times Magazine on one major downside of electronic health records go >>
  • Sierra magazine profiles the ongoing challenges Beverly Wright and others face in combating environmental racism in New Orleans go >>
  • The LA Times explores John Luther Adams' career and his most recent work go >>
  • Mason Bates to premiere his new work, "Garden of Eden," with the Richmond Symphony Orchestra go >>
  • Jane Lubchenco receives 2018 Vannevar Bush Award go >>
  • Salman Khan receives the 2018 Visonary of the Year Award form The San Francisco Chronicle go >>
  • John Luther Adams writes in the New York Times what it is like to hear the desert in music go >>
  • Freeman Hrabowski III reflects in The Atlantic on UMBC's successes in closing the achievement gap go >>
  • John Luther Adams and his new compositition, Become Desert, are profiled by the Seattle Times go >>
  • Elizabeth Kolbert explores our misunderstandings about race and our genetic heritage for National Geographic go >>
  • Gretchen Daily is profiled in Stanford Magazine about helping organizations understand Natural Capital go >>
  • John Luther Adams writes about Alaska and his new work, Become Desert, for Slate go >>
  • Leroy Hood reflects on almost two decades with the Institute for Systems Biology go >>
  • Freeman Hrabowski III to receive the American Council on Education’s Lifetime Achievement Award go >>
  • James Nachtwey's series on opioid addiction is TIME's first issue devoted entirely to one photographer's work go >>
  • Dan Sperling co-authors piece on the significant benefits of using Uber and Lyft for carpooling go >>
  • Hal Harvey co-authors an Op-Ed for The New York Times on a utility's embrace of wind and solar go >>
  • Sanjeev Arora writes Op-Ed for The Hill on why rural Americans lack access to quality health care go >>
  • Jacques d'Amboise and an event on 'Balanchine's Guys' is profiled by New York Times go >>
  • Nadine Burke Harris is interviewed about her work on childhood trauma by The New York Times go >>
  • The Los Angeles Times reviews Dave Egger's new book, The Monk of Mokha go >>
  • Nadine Burke Harris is profiled on NPR about her work and new book, The Deepest Well go >>
  • Paul Farmer is awarded the National Academy of Sciences' 2018 Public Welfare Award go >>
  • A 2014 stage adaptation of Natasha Trethewey’s poetry collection, Native Guard, is performed at the Atlanta History Center go >>
  • Sal Khan is named 2018 Visionary of the Year by the San Francisco Chronicle go >>
  • The New York Times looks at how some U.S. prisons have restricted prisoner access to Michelle Alexander's book, The New Jim Crow go >>
  • Freeman Hrabowski talks to The Baltimore Sun about being inspired to march as a teenager by Martin Luther King Jr. go >>
  • Bruce Katz co-authors a new book, The New Localism, on the evolving importance of metropolitan areas go >>
  • The Flux podcast talks in depth with Dean Kamen about inventing go >>
  • Politico profiles Dean Kamen’s work on the ARMI Initiative for regenerative organ medicine go >>
  • Mona Hanna-Attisha's work in Flint, MI, highlights a rising focus on environmental health impacts in medicine go >>
  • Sangeeta Bhatia is profiled in Brown University's alumni magazine go >>
  • John Holdren to receive the 2018 Moynihan Prize from The American Academy of Political and Social Science go >>
  • The Wall Street Journal profiles Joseph DeSimone's 3D printing company, Carbon, and its partnership with Adidas go >>
  • Mason Bates is named Musical America's 2018 Composer of the Year go >>
  • Steve Wozniak to launch Woz U, an education program to help people enter into the tech workforce go >>
  • Jacques d'Amboise is interviewed on the Leonard Lopate Show go >>
  • Roz Chast's relationship to NYC is profiled in The New York Times go >>
  • Jerry Franklin and his ideas for new forestry practices are profiled in Science go >>
  • Greg Asner is interviewed by NPR's Living On Earth go >>
  • Mona Hanna-Attisha is interviewed by WESA public radio in Pittsburgh go >>
  • Rita Dove is profiled as one of TIME Firsts: Women Leaders Who Are Changing the World go >>
  • Hugh Herr is profiled in-depth by Outside Magazine go >>
  • The Los Angeles Times explores John Luther Adams’ new art installation at UC San Diego go >>
  • Bruce Katz co-authors new research on how cities can deliver better outcomes for children and youth go >>
  • The New York Times Travel Section explores August Wilson's Pittsburgh go >>
  • John Holdren receives the Huntington Environmental Prize from Woods Hole Research Center go >>
  • Dean Kamen launches BioFabUSA to aggregate technologies for creating human tissue and organs go >>
  • John Harbison is profiled by the Wisconsin Gazette go >>
  • Janine Benyus and her work is profiled on the 20th anniversary of her book, “Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature” go >>
  • NPR explores the creation of Mason Bates' first opera, The (R)evolution Of Steve Jobs go >>
  • Herbert Needleman, 2nd Heinz Award recipient for the Environment, who exposed developmental dangers of lead exposure, dies at 89 go >>
  • John Luther Adams' music gets a five-day festival courtesy of SFJAZZ go >>
  • Hugh Herr and his work is profiled in a BBC News article on prosthetics go >>
  • Aaron Wolf is interviewed by The Texas Tribune go >>
  • 'Bending the Arc,' a documentary about Paul Farmer's organization, Partners In Health, is reviewed in Nature go >>
  • Gretchen Daily is 2017 recipient of the Asahi Blue Planet Prize go >>
  • Roz Chast is profiled in The Daily Beast go >>
  • August Wilson's 'Jitney' captures best play revival at 2017 Tony Awards go >>
  • Frederica Perera writes OpEd piece on prenatal environmental risks for The New York Times go >>
  • Bernice Johnson Reagon and Sweet Honey in the Rock is profiled by PBS' American Masters go >>
  • Herb Needleman and his pioneering work on lead poisoning is profiled by NOVA Next go >>
  • Rick Lowe is named as a 2017 Graham Foundation recipient go >>
  • John Luther Adams' work with bird song is explored by the New York TImes go >>
  • John Harbison is profiled on NPR's Nashville Symphony Broadcasts go >>
  • Freeman Hrabowski is profiled in The New York Times' Corner Office series go >>
  • Leila Janah is profiled in The New York Times' Corner Office series go >>
  • John Holdren speaks out on the need to defend the role of science go >>
  • Nancy Knowlton writes Op-Ed for Nature magazine on encouraging conservation through celebrating our successes go >>
  • Elizabeth Kolbert receives the 2017 Blake-Dodd Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters go >>
  • Dorothy Height is honored with a United States Black Heritage postage stamp go >>
  • Sanjeev Arora's Project ECHO receives $10 million grant for patients living in rural and underserved areas in the U.S. and Africa go >>
  • Millie Dresselhaus, pioneering scientist and 11th Heinz Award recipient for Technology and the Economy, dies at 86 go >>
  • Jane Lubchenco is awarded the National Academy of Sciences' 2017 Public Welfare Award go >>
  • The Austin Chronicle reviews Ann Hamilton’s latest iteration of O N E E V E R Y O N E at the University of Austin go >>
  • Leroy Hood is the 2017 recipient of National Academy of Sciences Award for Chemistry in Service to Society go >>
  • 'True South: Henry Hampton and "Eyes on the Prize"' is reviewed by The New York Times go >>
  • The New York Times reviews the new Broadway production of August Wilson's "Jitney" go >>

The Heinz Awards

1998

Amory Lovins

Amory Lovins receives the Heinz Award in the Environment for his extraordinary accomplishments in alerting the world to the enormous potential of energy efficiency and renewable energy resources.

Chosen several years ago by the editors of The Wall Street Journal as one of the people most likely to change the face of world industry, Mr. Lovins is an environmental visionary. He is already credited with having done more than any other single individual to redefine the thinking around energy policy and to link it with environment, development and security issues. He, his wife Hunter, and the team of researchers at the resource policy center they co-founded in Snowmass, Colorado delight in challenging conventional wisdom by demonstrating advanced resource productivity that avoids depletion and pollution, and still shows a profit.

He has done original work of high intellectual merit and has popularized his work far better than anyone else in the field, aggressively moving his ideas into widespread practice, chiefly via the private sector.

It was evident early on that Amory Lovins had the makings of a genius. At age 21, after studying at Harvard and Oxford University, he became Oxford's youngest junior faculty member in 400 years. While there, he intended to pursue an interest in the details of energy policy, two years before the oil embargo put those issues on the world's agenda. When the university protested, he left.

Almost immediately, he set about redefining the energy debate, which, at the time, focused entirely on how more energy could be produced to meet an ever-growing demand. Mr. Lovins turned that challenge on its head by suggesting a radically different focus, not on getting more energy of any kind from any source at any price, but on providing just the amount, type, scale and source of energy that would provide each desired service in the cheapest way. That suggestion was challenged by many energy experts and greeted with derision by industry. But Mr. Lovins, frequently using his opponents' statistics against them, calmly continued to argue his case and to meet with, debate and inform utility executives, other industry leaders and policy makers. Many of them turned from critics into clients. As a result of his work, new methods were developed to allow utilities to profit from energy efficiency, methods that have been implemented in many areas around the United States. Even more significantly, the powerful new idea - that properly structured, sustainable, least-cost energy and resource options can be beneficial both to the environment and to industry - was introduced.

In 1982, Mr. Lovins expanded his work by establishing with his wife the Rocky Mountain Institute, a research and educational foundation. Today, the pair, along with a staff of more than 40, blaze new trails investigating efficiency issues and proposing solutions that, while they may spring from Mr. Lovins' boundless creativity, are firmly rooted in reality. One such solution currently engaging Mr. Lovins is the design of a "hypercar," an ultra-lightweight, hybrid-electric vehicle, now moving rapidly toward the marketplace. Not only would these vehicles save fuel and prevent pollution, but Mr. Lovins argues that by accelerating the introduction of fuel cell-powered versions, hypercars used as plug-in mobile generators could quickly and profitably displace today's coal and nuclear power plants.

Mr. Lovins has briefed heads of state, written and co-authored dozens of books and hundreds of papers, and served as an advisor to scores of boards, businesses and institutions. He argues that the U.S. can operate on a fourth of the energy it now uses, while still providing the same or better services. This may seem far-fetched, but Mr. Lovins has been accused of taking off on flights of fancy before. Together, both he and time both have a remarkable way of proving his assertions correct.

Note: This profile is excerpted from the commemorative brochure published at the time of the awards' presentation.


UPDATES SINCE RECEIVING THE HEINZ AWARD

October 2011 - Amory Lovins, the chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute and the author of influential books like Winning the Oil Endgame and Natural Capitalism, releases his latest book, Reinventing Fire, proposing methods to run an economy that's 158 percent larger by 2050 without any coal, oil, nuclear energy, or new inventions (and one-third less natural gas). - GreenBiz.com

April 2009 - Amory Lovins is named a recipient of the 10th National Design Awards (Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum) in recognition for his work at the nexus of energy, resources, environment, development and security in more than 50 countries for 40 years, including 14 years based in England. - 10th National Design Awards

November 2007 - For his "outstanding achievements in the field of energy efficiency," Lovins receives the Volvo Environment Prize at a ceremony in Stockholm. The prize ($235,390 USD) is awarded by an independent foundation, and the selection committee is comprised of internationally recognized scientists and researchers in the fields of economics and environmental studies. - Volvo Environment Prize

November 2007 - Ford Motor Company Executive Chairman Bill Ford appoints Lovins to a newly-formed Transformation Advisory Council designed to help advance Ford's sustainability initiatives. - U.S. Newswire

July 2007 - Lovins wins the Blue Planet prize for "for his contributions to leading global energy strategy for protection of the global environment by efficient utilization of energy." Sponsored by Japan's Asahi Glass Foundation, the environmental prize is worth $407,000 (USD). - The Blue Planet Prize

March 2007 - Lovins relinquishes CEO post at the Rocky Mountain Institute in order to focus on thought leadership, strategic influence, and high-impact special initiatives. These initiatives include leading the implementation of RMI's Pentagon-cosponsored roadmap, Winning the Oil Endgame, for getting the U.S. completely off oil by the 2040s, led by business for profit. Lovins now serves as chairman and chief scientist. - Rocky Mountain Institute

August 2005 - Lovins gives a talk in Bar Harbor, Maine based on his latest book, Winning the Oil Endgame. The speech outlines Lovins' energy policy ideas and includes his ideas for "combining innovative technologies and new business models with uncommon public policies" in an effort to thwart a business led oil solution rather than one dictated by the government. - The Press Herald

June 2005 - Lovins releases his latest article, "Security Meltdown." The article severely questions and discredits "Washington's wisdom to promote new nuclear plants through federal subsidies," and insists that nuclear construction is not a practical or viable way to deal with increasing climate change. - Energy Washington Week

Amory Lovins
Amory Lovins