Senator John Heinz

RELATED NEWS

  • Mona Hanna-Attisha writes OpEd for the Washington Post on the EPA's proposed limiting of types of scientific studies used for new regulations go >>
  • Robert Langer co-authors scientific article on new once-a-month contraceptive pill go >>
  • Hugh Herr is interviewed by Medgagdget.com about his work and current research on bionic limbs go >>
  • Joe DeSimone is named Ernst and Young’s Entrepreneur of the Year for 2019 go >>
  • Amanda Nguyen named recipient of a South by Southwest Community Service Award go >>
  • Rita Dove receives the 2019 Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets go >>
  • Mary Good, 6th recipient for Technology, the Economy and Employment and "true pioneer and icon for women in science," dies at 88 go >>
  • Robert Langer helps to develop a longterm oral delivery pill for malaria drug go >>
  • Kevin Jerome Everson is interviewed by online arts magazine Hyperallergic go >>
  • Sangeeta Bhatia elected to National Academy of Medicine, one of only 25 inidividuals elected to all three academies go >>
  • Ralph Lemon is profiled by Rennie McDougall for Frieze magazine go >>
  • NPR's Weekend Edition profiles Mark di Suvero go >>
  • Sanjeev Arora receives Governor of New Mexico's Distinguished Service Award for Lifetime Achievement go >>
  • Sherri Mason writes about the pervasiveness of plastics in our environment for American Scientist go >>
  • Nadine Burke Harris' work on statewide screening for childhood trauma is profiled by The Chronicle of Social Change go >>
  • Mona Hanna-Attisha writes Op-Ed for The New York Times go >>
  • Paul Farmer talks about health equity with Bay Area NPR go >>
  • Matt Mullenweg is interviewed by The Verge about Automattic's purchase of Tumblr go >>
  • Joseph DeSimone is profiled by Alejandro Cremades for Forbes go >>
  • Dave Eggers write Op-Ed piece about teh second International Congress of Youth Voices, held in Puerto Rico go >>
  • Hugh Herr is featured in 60 Minutes overview of MIT's Media Lab go >>
  • Sherri Mason named first sustainability coordinator at Penn State Behrend go >>
  • Rita Dove receives the Langston Hughes Medal from The City College of New York go >>
  • Nadine Burke Harris is profiled by NPR as California's first Surgeon General go >>
  • Mona Hanna-Attisha is interviewed about the lead-in-water crisis in Newark go >>
  • Sherri Mason writes Op-Ed on plastics for The Hill go >>
  • August Wilson's play, "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom," to be filmed in Pittsburgh for Netflix go >>
  • Greg Asner's work with his Global Airborne Observatory is profiled by The New York Times go >>
  • Sangeeta Bhatia is the 2019 recipient of the Science History Institute's Othmer Gold Medal go >>
  • Robert Langer is the recipient of the 2019 Dreyfus Prize in Chemical Sciences go >>
  • The American Institute of Chemical Engineers endows new fellowship in Robert Langer's name go >>
  • Natasha Trethewey is inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters go >>
  • U.S. Senator Richard Lugar, co-recipient of the 10th Chairman's medal, dies at 87 go >>
  • The New York Times honors the 50th anniversary of Arthur Mitchell’s pioneering Dance Theater of Harlem through the recollections of those who worked with him go >>
  • Gretchen Daily heads case study demonstrating the benefits of managing land for both economic and environmental benefits go >>
  • Nadine Burke Harris, California's first Surgeon General, is interviewed by EdSource go >>
  • Natasha Trethewey and her latest book are profiled by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette go >>
  • The New York Times profiles Carol Gilligan and her new book go >>
  • Dave Eggers' latest book, The Parade, is reviewed by the Los Angeles Times and The New York Times go >>
  • The New York Times interviews Roz Chast and her sometime writing and ukulele partner, Patricia Marx go >>
  • Ming Kuo is lead author on metastudy showing that experience of nature boosts children's academic achievement and development go >>
  • Boston Modern Orchestra Project to end their season with April tribute to John Harbison go >>
  • Michelle Alexander writes OpEd for The New York TImes on the need to face violent crime honestly and courageously go >>
  • Natasha Trethewey talks about making poetry in an interview for Guernica go >>
  • John Harbison is profiled by the Wisconsin State Journal for his 80th birthday go >>
  • Mona Hanna-Attisha pens an OpEd about remaining lessons from the Flint water crisis go >>
  • Mason Bates' first opera, "The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs," wins a Grammy for Best Opera Recording go >>
  • Edward Zigler, architect of Head Start and 5th Public Policy recipient, dies at 88 go >>
  • Nadine Burke Harris to be appointed as California's first Surgeon General go >>
  • Natasha Trethewey is named as a chancellor for The Academy of American Poets go >>
  • Luis Garden Acosta, co-recipient of the 5th Heinz Award for the Human Condition, dies at 73 go >>
  • Cary Fowler discusses the Svalbard Global Seed Vault on the BBC’s “Witness” podcast go >>
  • Arthur Mitchell is honored in a memorial service at Manhattan's Riverside Church go >>
  • Natasha Trethewey is profiled in Buzzfeed News go >>
  • Joseph DeSimone receives the 2018 National Academy of Sciences prize in convergent science go >>
  • John Harbison and his multi-decade career is profiled by Strings magazine go >>
  • Roz Chast is interviewed, on the occasion of her new retrospective, by The New York Times go >>
  • James Comer's School Development Program at the Yale Child Study Center celebrates 50 years go >>
  • Vanity Fair interviews Natasha Trethewey about her work and new retrospective poetry collection, "Monument" go >>
  • The New York Times reviews 'Relations,' with Ralph Lemon, Bebe Miller and Ishmael Houston-Jones go >>
  • Natasha Trethewey is interviewed by NPR's Weekend Edition go >>
  • John Luther Adams writes for The Guardian on why he chose music over activism go >>
  • Joseph DeRisi talks about his work and virus hunting on Still Untitled - The Adam Savage Project go >>
  • Gregory Asner to establish Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science at Arizona State University go >>
  • Jane Lubchenco awarded the 2018 Fellow Medal from California Academy of Sciences go >>
  • George Hatsopoulos, 3rd Heinz Awards recipient in Technology, the Economy and Employment, dies at 91 go >>
  • Arthur Mitchell, 7th Heinz Awards recipient for Arts and Humantities, dies at 84 go >>
  • John Luther Adams' work, In the Name of the Earth, to premiere in Central Park this Saturday go >>
  • Dave Eggers writes an article for The Guardian about The International Congress of Youth Voices go >>
  • TIME interviews Mona Hanna-Attisha on the occasion of her new book go >>
  • The Carnegie Corporation honors Mona Hanna-Attisha as one of 38 Distinguished Immigrants for 2018 go >>
  • Michelle Alexander to join The New York Times opinion pages go >>
  • Mona Hanna-Attisha is interviewed by Rachel Maddow go >>
  • Ann Hamilton's O N E E V E R Y O N E receives the Americans for the Arts’ Public Art Network award go >>
  • Hugh Herr has a new TED talk on what it would really mean to be a cyborg go >>
  • Jake Wood of Team Rubicon to receive the Pat Tillman Award for Service at 2018 ESPYs go >>
  • Mona Hanna-Attisha adapts a chapter from her new book for The New York Times' Op-Ed page go >>
  • Greg Asner helps to create high-resolution maps of Caribbean coral reefs go >>
  • Dee Boersma and her work are featured in The Pew Charitable Trusts' "After the Fact" podcast go >>
  • James Nachtwey is profiled by The Times in London as his new show, Memoria, is on in Paris go >>
  • Rita Dove talks to the Columbia Journalism Review on pairing poetry with journalism go >>
  • Abraham Verghese writes a piece for The New York Times Magazine on one major downside of electronic health records go >>
  • Sierra magazine profiles the ongoing challenges Beverly Wright and others face in combating environmental racism in New Orleans go >>
  • The LA Times explores John Luther Adams' career and his most recent work go >>
  • Mason Bates to premiere his new work, "Garden of Eden," with the Richmond Symphony Orchestra go >>
  • Jane Lubchenco receives 2018 Vannevar Bush Award go >>
  • Salman Khan receives the 2018 Visonary of the Year Award form The San Francisco Chronicle go >>
  • John Luther Adams writes in the New York Times what it is like to hear the desert in music go >>
  • Freeman Hrabowski III reflects in The Atlantic on UMBC's successes in closing the achievement gap go >>
  • John Luther Adams and his new compositition, Become Desert, are profiled by the Seattle Times go >>

The Heinz Awards

2001

Aaron Beck

Dr. Aaron Beck receives the Heinz Award in the Human Condition for his pioneering breakthrough in developing cognitive therapy as an effective treatment of psychological disorders in millions of individuals suffering mental and behavioral health challenges. Dr. Beck is the founder of the fastest growing, most extensively studied form of psychotherapy in America, which he calls "simple and effective."

Presently the University Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Beck is world renowned as the "father of cognitive therapy." He was trained as a psychiatrist in the 1940s and 50s when the prevailing treatments for mental disorders were either medication or psychoanalytic therapy. He felt that neither of these approaches was conducive to helping people learn to help themselves, to develop confidence, hope, and enduring positive change.

Dr. Beck's early research into the psychology of depression prompted him to develop a treatment that would help patients to understand and deal with their psychological problems and led to significant advances in the treatment not only of depression, but also of anxiety, panic and eating disorders, phobias and suicidal problems as well. More recently, this treatment has been applied successfully to substance abuse and schizophrenia.

Cognitive therapists believe that psychological disorders are based in part on distorted outlooks, which can be adjusted if a patient recognizes his errors in thinking. Depressed patients, for example, see the glass as half empty, never half full. Focusing on problem solving provides an appealing and cost-effective alternative to increasingly popular drug treatments. In fact, cognitive therapy is the only psychotherapy to have had over 200 clinical trials or outcome studies indicating its effectiveness. By identifying self-defeating thoughts in emotional, psychological and behavioral disorders, cognitive therapists can offer patients immediate treatment, unlike more traditional therapies that take much longer to have any perceptible impact.

Dr. Beck's cognitive therapy has brought relief to millions of patients and sparked a revolution in psychotherapy. His courageous and brilliant research, practice, teaching and mentorship have resulted in the training of thousands of mental health professionals who are making significant advances toward helping people who suffer the ill effects of stress and emotional disorders. Over the years, bright, young, idealistic mental health professionals have gravitated to Dr. Beck, more recently to the Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy and Research, directed by his daughter, Dr. Judith Beck, in Philadelphia, seeking a new direction for their life's work. These professionals have established training and research centers in practically every developed nation in the world.

Dr. Beck's contributions to his field have influenced not only psychiatry and psychology, but other mental health disciplines as well, including psychiatric social work, nursing and counseling. It is difficult to overstate the impact of Dr. Beck's innovative approach as an alternative to the more traditional long-term psychotherapy. Dr. Beck's groundbreaking approach that created cognitive therapy has resulted in a gift to the millions of people whose lives are so much better because of it.

Note: This profile is excerpted from the commemorative brochure published at the time of the awards' presentation.


UPDATES SINCE RECEIVING THE HEINZ AWARD

October 2013 - Aaron T. Beck, M.D., became the first recipient of the Kennedy Community Mental Health Award from the Kennedy Forum, a new initiative led by former U.S. representative Patrick J. Kennedy focused on improving the lives of people with mental illness, while at the same time recognizing the enormous strides made in patient care and research over the last 50 years. - University of Pennsylvania

November 2009 - Beck, "the father of cognitive therapy," has been presented with the Anna-Monika Prize, awarded once every two years by the Anna-Monika Foundation, for advancing knowledge of the biological structure and functional disturbances of depression. - University of Pennsylvania

September 2006 - Beck will receive the 2006 Albert Lasker Clinical Medical Research Award for his pioneering work in developing cognitive therapy as a treatment for depression and other mental health conditions. This award, valued at $100,000, is considered to be the nation's most prestigious medical prize. - The New York Times

January 2006 - Beck receives the Adolf Meyer Award, and gives the Adolf Meyer Award lecture at a conference held by the American Psychiatric Association. - Beck Institute

October 2005 - Beck receives the second-ever Morselli Medal for Lifetime of Research in the Field of Suicide. The Morselli Medal, given by the International Academy for Suicide Research, is granted to those who demonstrate exhaustive efforts in the study of suicide and its methods of prevention. - International Academy of Suicide Research

December 2003 - Beck wins the $200,000 Grawemeyer Award for Psychology from the University of Louisville, notably because he is considered "the founder of cognitive therapy" and has contributed greatly to new and improved systems of psychotherapy. - Philadelphia Daily News

October 2003 - Beck receives the 2003 Sarnat International Award in Mental Health from the Institute of Medicine. The award, which includes a medal and a $20,000 cash prize, is being given to Beck "in recognition of the international scope and significance of his contributions to psychiatry and mental health." - Institute of Medicine

December 2002 - Beck receives the inaugural Exemplary Achievement Award, presented to him by the Treatment and Research Advancements National Associations for Personality Disorders, for his work and research in the field of bi-polar disorder. - Beck Institute

January 2001 - Beck is honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Philadelphia Psychiatric Society for his work in the field of cognitive therapy. - Beck Institute

Speech

3/5/2001 - Acceptance Speech

Well, thank you, thank you, thank you. I'm deeply honored to be selected for the Award for the Human Condition, and to be included with those who have made such important contributions to society. I'm especially grateful to the Foundation, and specifically to Teresa Heinz, for their policy of encouraging non-traditional, innovative approaches to the solution of human problems, as well as the enrichment of our cultural heritage. By recognizing the efforts of innovators and highlighting the importance of these achievements, I believe the Awards move us forward to the betterment of mankind.

The Award ceremony gives me a chance to reflect on what experiences led to my being here today. When I was growing up, I was largely interested in nature. I participated in bird watches. I identified plants and trees and examined microbes under a microscope. For many years I served as a camp naturalist. Later, I became interested in what makes people tick; particularly what makes them happy or sad, and confident or insecure.

When I eventually ended up in the field of psychiatry, I became involved in observing the more extreme aspects of the spectrum of human behavior. I was struck in particular, about how people's biases against themselves and against other people, were the cause of much suffering; their excessive anxiety, anger, and depression. It seemed that a good part of these complex problems could be attributed to our evolutionary history. It's better to over-react to potential danger than to under-react. False positives are better than false negatives. One false negative and you're eliminated from the gene pool.

Thus, the price of survival and preservation of our lineage would be a lifetime of angst or anger. These innate dispositions of course, are accentuated by life's circumstances and situations. These two factors conversely, produce a very strong bias in the way afflicted individuals evaluate themselves and other people, and do lead to psychiatric disorders.

However, it's not inevitable that we should be the victims of our evolutionary heritage and the various traumas that we've experienced during our development. Nature has also endowed us with the mental resources to overcome these engrained patterns. By tapping into these rational resources, we can correct our cognitive biases through a procedure that I've called cognitive therapy, and free ourselves to deal with the problems realistically and to attain a reasonable way of life.

Even the floridly delusional patients have the potential for correcting their extreme biases. With help, they can learn to activate the rational part of their minds and direct it to correct their irrational tendencies. These same principles can be applied on a broad scale. The same kind of biases that lead to irrational anger in marital conflicts, say, present in such complex societal problems as prejudice, ethnic conflict, and, yes, even wars.

We can draw on our rich resources of rationality to recognize and modify the irrationality that causes so much suffering. The voice of reason is silent, but we can use appropriate methods to amplify it and of course, to listen to it.

In closing, I'd like to express my appreciation to the members of my family who have, in their own way, supported my work. To my wife, Phyllis, who's been the balance wheel between my self doubts and my runaway fantasies. And my three children who are here today, who have worked with me in various capacities as consultants, and also as my directors.

Thank you again.
Aaron Beck